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HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE
OBJECTIVES OF THE SCHOOL
CAREER PROSPECTS
SCHOOL DEPARTMENTS
CURRICULUM PRINCIPLES
CURRICULUM

HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

The School of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering was founded in 1969 and teaching commenced during the academic year 1969-70. Originally, the School formed part of the Faculty of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering of NTUA, where a degree in Marine Engineering had been offered for several years. Professor Frangoulis, who was Rector of NTUA at that time, took the initiative to promote the founding of a new, separate School. At the time of its founding, three faculty chairs were created in Ship Theory, Ship Design and Construction, and Marine Engineering, and in 1974 the School produced its first graduates. Up to 1982 the Academic Staff consisted of few members and the decision was then taken to increase their number and with the influx of new staff, the teaching material has been substantially broadened, updated and revised. Ever since its inception, the School has been heavily involved in research activities. One important milestone in this area was the commencement of the activities of the Experimental Towing Tank in 1979. More recently, the School has been organized around four Departments, namely: Naval and Marine Hydrodynamics, Ship Design and Maritime Transport, Marine Engineering and Marine Structures.

OBJECTIVES OF THE SCHOOL

The aim of the School is to provide education and carry out research in all fields related to Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, as well as other related fields that can be grouped under the broader title of Maritime Technology. In this way, the School addresses the needs of the local shipbuilding industry and the merchant marine by producing well-trained graduate naval architects and marine engineers. It should be added that the degree offered covers both naval architecture and marine engineering, in contrast to the separate courses followed in certain other countries.

CAREER PROSPECTS

At a professional level, Naval Architects and Marine Engineers may become involved in one or more of the following activities during the course of their careers: Shipyards Design, Management of New Buildings, Management of Repairs, Ship Design Consultancies. Self-employed or in collaboration with others. Consultancies usually offer services on such matters as technical advice, new designs, claims reports and estimates, Public Sector: Mercantile Marine (Inspector-ate of Merchant Ships), Ministry of National Defence (Navy), Hellenic Register of Shipping, Research Institutes, public sector com-panies (Public Petroleum Corporation, Marine Technology Development Company etc), banks, insurance companies, Ship-owning and Ship Management Companies. Sea-going engineer, marine superintendent, new construction and repairs surveyor, chartering, claims etc, Classification Societies: All major Classification Societies have offices within the Piraeus area and carry out plan approval and/or class inspections, Academic Career: Within higher education and technical education institutions in Greece and abroad, Engineering Consultancies. There is no unemployment amongst naval architects graduates of NTUA.

SCHOOL DEPARTMENTS

The educational and research activities of the School have been separated into the following four Departments: Corresponding to the four Departments are four Laboratories, which can be considered to be National Laboratories since no other such facilities exist within Greece.

Department of Naval and Marine Hydrodynamics

It serves the following areas: Free-surface hydrodynamics. Wave-body interaction problems. Ship motions and loads, Numerical solutions of Navier-Stokes equations. Calculation of turbulent flow around the ship. Ship resistance, Modelling and prediction of wave phenomena in the sea environment (surface waves and acoustic waves), Stochastic modelling and analysis of wave parameters. Wave climate. Wind and wave atlases, Analysis and design of propulsion systems. Cavitation and noise. Hull-propeller unsteady interaction. Non-conventional propulsion systems and energy saving devices, Hydrodynamic design of displacement ships, planning hulls and yachts. Design of bulbous bows. Maneuverability of ships, Sea-keeping and operability analysis of ships, Inverse problems. Acoustic tomography in the sea, Theoretical and Computational investigation of evolution of substance mixtures near the free surface, Theoretical and Computational investigation of coupled fluid structure vibrations in sea environment, Towing tank hydrodynamic tests of ship and floating structure models (resistance tests, self propulsion tests, sea-keeping tests, open water propeller tests), Full scale measurement of sea-keeping performance and speed. It has the Laboratory:

Department of Ship Design and Maritime Transport

Research of the Department concerns various disciplines of the concurrent engineering approach to ship design/operation and of maritime transport. Research activities address the following specific subjects: Ship design and optimisation, Development of Advanced Marine Vehicles concepts (mono- and multihulls), Development of technoeconomic ship databases, Computer Aided Ship Design (CASD), Applications of artificial intelligence to ship design, Applications of Virtual Reality Models to ship design and life cycle, Applications of Computer-Aided Geometric Modelling (CAGD), Development of software tools for ship design and operation, Regulations of ship stability and maritime safety, Formal Safety Assessment of ship design and operation, Analysis of marine accidents, Risk-based ship design, Risk assessment techniques for communication and information exchange, Technological and human aspects of maritime efficiency and safety, Techno-economic studies of ship design and operation, Technoeconomic specifications and shipbuilding contract, Economics of maritime transport, Short sea shipping and inland waterway transport, Maritime business administration, Operations research on marine pollution, Decision support tools for oil spill control, Technologies to optimise maritime operational safety, Technologies to optimise manpower onboard ships. It has the Laboratory:

Department of Marine Structures

The Department and its Laboratory are involved in sponsored and non-sponsored research activities utilizing both numerical and experimental techniques and directed towards investigating those material, fabrication, environmental and service factors that affect the performance of marine structures. Some of the recent research activities are outlined below: Linear and non-linear static and dynamic numerical analysis of marine structures. Ship collision problems. Repair and maintenance of ship structures. Failure analysis of components and structures. Marine accident investigation. Corrosion and Protection of Marine Structures. Hydromechanical analysis and design of marine structures other than ships, including moored floating structures. Hydroelasticity problems. Hydrodynamic analysis of interconnected small- or large-volume floating structures. Design and efficiency evaluation of single or interacting wave-energy converters. Measurement and analysis of residual stresses and distortion during welding and their effect on the mechanical behaviour of metal structures. Metallurgical study of welded and treated materials. Surface treatments by conventional and non-conventional techniques. Thermo-mechanical modelling of welding and surface treatments. Surface modification techniques. Tribological behaviour of engineered surfaces. Deterministic and reliability-based analysis and design of marine structures made of composite materials. Static and dynamic buckling and post-buckling behaviour of laminated composite plates and cylindrical shells under various loading combinations. It has the Laboratory:

Department of Marine Engineering

The Department and it's Laboratory is involved in the following R&D subjects within the field of propulsion and energy systems: Development of thermo-physical models for predicting the performance and emissions of Marine Diesel engines. Simulation of propulsion system operation, especially under transient loading conditions. Detailed experimental measurements of engine performance and emissions, fault diagnosis of marine diesel engines, data acquisition on board ships. Thermo chemical fluid dynamic models of combustion and flow. Development of methods for analysis and optimization, design and operation of energy systems with technical, economic and environmental considerations. Multivariable, multiobjective optimization. Systems may consist of steam turbines, gas turbines, diesel engines, fuel cells or their combinations. Marine electrical engineering and electric propulsion: Ship electric energy system analysis at steady and transient state. Detailed modelling of propulsion motor and their associated drives. Power quality analyses and measurements on ship electric networks. Vibrations and acoustics in ship technology: Investigations on vibration, operational noise, torsional vibrations of marine diesel engines and ship shafting lines. Theoretical analysis of non-linear dynamics systems with several degrees of freedom and a multitude of boundary conditions. Automatic control of propulsion systems: Supervisory operating point and regulatory feedback control, PID and state-feedback control, mathematical models of propulsion systems for control. It has the Laboratory:

CURRICULUM PRINCIPLES

The academic curriculum not only covers the theoretical fundamentals of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, but also gives students the opportunity to study a number of additional subjects that are required at a professional level. Thus, in addition to the forty-eight mandatory courses, there is seventy-four elective courses whose contents are related to the professional activities of naval architects and marine engineers. During the first seven semesters, students attend mandatory courses that are followed by other engineering students as well, in order to develop a sound basis in engineering science disciplines. Included in these is a course in foreign language scientific terminology. At the beginning of the eighth semester, students select one of two streams of study. This allows them to go into greater depth in the field of their choice.

Stream 1: Design and Construction of Ships and Offshore Structures
Stream 1 addresses students who wish to elaborate on the design and construction of ships and offshore structures. The core courses include ship design, ship and offshore hydrodynamics (including advanced topics on powering, seakeeping, maneuvering and small craft design), special topics on ship structures, hull vibrations, reliability of marine structures and composite materials.
Stream 2: Marine Engineering and Maritime Economics
Stream 2 is addressed to students who wish to be specialized mostly as chief or superintended engineers in the national (or international) fleet of merchant and passenger ships. The main courses include advanced topics on marine engineering (marine Diesel engines, turbines, vibrations), ship operability, maritime economics and transportation, ship systems control and ship survey and maintenance. The curriculum is structured in such a way that students can enrol in courses in both Directions concurrently, depending on their personal choice. The academic curriculum is structured so that a joint Diploma in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering is obtained, which, through the inclusion of a number of additional courses allows graduates to practice mechanical engineering as well.

C U R R I C U L U M

Courses in the 1st semester
Mandatory
Introduction to Naval Architecture and Maritime Technology - Mechanical Engineering Drawing I - Mechanical and Naval Architectural Laboratory I - Introduction to Computing with Practice within a PC Environment - Linear Algebra and Applications - Mathematical Analysis (Functions of a Single Variable) - Statics of Rigid bodies - Physics I (Mechanics)
Courses in the 2nd semester
Mandatory
Mechanical Engineering Drawing II - Mechanical and Naval Architectural Laboratory II - C programming language and the Unix operating system - Mathematical Analysis (Functions of several Variables and Vector Analysis) - Analytic, Differential and Projective Geometry - Mechanics of Deformable Bodies - Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism)
Courses in the 3rd semester
Mandatory
Hydrostatics and Ship Stability - Science and Technology of Materials I and Laboratory (Metals) - Electrotechnology - Ordinary Differential Equations and Complex Functions - Numerical Analysis I and Laboratory - Mechanics of Deformable Bodies II - Laboratory Physics
Courses in the 4th semester
Mandatory
Mechanics of Fluids - Thermodynamics I (Single Variable Thermodynamics) - Elements of Machines (Strength, Gears, Transmission Systems) - Science and Technology of Materials II and Laboratory (Non-metallic Materials, Corrosion) - Dynamics of Solid Bodies
Courses in the 5th semester
Mandatory
Principles of Marine and Naval Hydrodynamics - Strength of Ships I - Electrical Technology Applications and Laboratory for Naval Architects and Marine Engineers - Partial Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems - Probability Theory and Statistics with Applications in the Maritime Environment - Experimental Mechanics of Materials and Laboratory
Courses in the 6th semester
Mandatory
CAD/CAM Systems for Ship Design and Construction - Ship Hydrodynamics - Dynamics of Ship Structures - Heat Transfer I (Principles and Applications) - Technological Economics - Internal Combustion Engines I and Laboratory
Courses in the 7th semester
Mandatory
Ship Design and Outfitting I (Preliminary Design) - CAD/CAM Systems for Ship Design and Construction - Ship Design Project I, Economics of Marine Transport I - Ship Systems and Auxiliary Machinery (piping systems, hydraulic systems, deck machinery) Propulsion Machinery - Shipbuilding Technology and Laboratory
Courses in the 8th semester

Stream 1
Ship Design and Outfitting II (Detailed Design) - Strength of Ship Structures (Local structural design) - Special Topics in Ship Hydrodynamics - Mooring of Offshore Structures - Ship Design Project II n Ship Dynamics and Seakeeping
Stream 2
- Economics of Marine Transport II - Marine Diesel Engines - Shipboard Energy Systems - Ship Control Systems - Engine Room Design IIb
Courses in the 9th semester

Stream 1
- Computer-aided Ship Design - Analysis and Design of Composite Material Vessels - Reliability of Ship Structures - Vibrations of Ship Hulls and Structural Components - Design of Offshore Structures - Hydrodynamic Design of Small Vessels
Stream 2
- Marine Engineering Laboratory - Ship and Fleet Operations - Analysis and Optimisation of Energy Systems - Noise and Vibration Technology in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering - Inspection, Repair and Maintenance of Ship Structures
Elective (Group C)
- Computational Fluid Mechanics - Functional Analysis with Applications in Maritime Science and Technology - Stochastic Modelling and Forecasting of Ship Systems - Health and Safety in the Maritime Environment - Practical Training - Wave Phenomena in the Maritime Environment - Fluid Flow - Welding Science and Technology - Introduction to Non-linear Systems with Applications to Naval Architecture

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